The Next Chapter

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There is a dichotomy of success and uncertainty at the end of every chapter. Where do I go from here? How do I maintain, even improve, the sequence of thought and activity that makes the plot unique?
Sometimes all there is to do is pick up the pen and continue writing. The act of writing, simply writing, can shepherd the storyline to places that were once inconceivable. Ideas flow and the prose thrives with emotion because it is raw and in a way unstructured. The pen has powers unforseen; powers that come into effect when there is no premeditated structure that the author is following. Other times, however, premeditated thought is necessary to continue the story, or else roadblocks and broken thoughts interrupt the prose. Often times if I have not given the coming plot line considerable thought I find myself rewriting the chapter multiple times before I finally get it right. Usually it’s because I am trying to force the plotline or a character’s emotions / reactions to a particular catalyst. Forcing the prose only makes the content more rigid, so the best thing to do is take a step back and consider every possible angle.
Sometimes you may feel like you’re stumbling into a black hole where all the content is either lost or void of emotion, I know I’ve fallen into this multiple times. Don’t let it discourage you. Writing, whether you like or dislike the content, is constructive. You can discover what works and what fails and it will ultimately compliment your story. So what I say to you is keep writing. Make good art and don’t let the realm of uncertainty discourage you. Embrace it, because more times than not you will be able to thrive from it.

About Connor Wilkins

Quickly, quickly... take your seat. Our storyteller is about to begin. Shhhh. Listen... His pipes are fluting emotions of myth and fable, but don't be fooled by fantasia for there are truths hidden within his unworldly tellings. We're drifting now... back in time to a world only he remembers.
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